King County Historical and Archival Society Meeting

The Kings County Historical & Archival Society, Inc., will hold its next meeting on Saturday March 28th at St. John’s United Church Hall in Sussex Corner, starting at 2 pm. The featured presentation will be a Show and Tell by members of their oldest prized possessions (not including their spouses!). All are welcome to attend.

These show and tells are quite interesting. Sometimes one or more of the members bring items to the meeting for display and discussion.

GANS Meeting March 24

The House on Refugee Hill: An Archaeological Time Capsule (Monthly Meeting)

Tuesday March 24, 2015

7:00 pm to 9:00 pm

33 Ochterloney Street, Suite 100, Dartmouth, NS

Join us for an illustrated talk by Dr. Jonathan Fowler addressing his recent archeological work in Beechville, an historic Black refugee community located in the HRM.

Dr. Jonathan Fowler is an historical archaeologist who teaches at Saint Mary’s University. He holds degrees from Saint Mary’s, Acadia University, the University of Sheffield, and the University of Oxford and has wide-ranging interests in the fields of archaeology, anthropology and history. For the past decade, Jonathan has directed archaeological excavations at Grand-Pre National Historic Site. He is the co-author, with Paul Erickson, of two popular books on regional archaeology, Underground Nova Scotia and Underground New Brunswick.

GANS lectures are open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.
Website: http://www.novascotiaancestors.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NovaScotiaAncestors
Twitter:  @NSAncestors

Column: Capital Punishment in Canada

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

Title: Column: Capital Punishment in Canada

Snippet: No family is perfect. Every family tree searched long enough will uncover an unsavory individual. The key is to remember they are not you; they have no bearing on your life. You do not wear their shame.

These people are often called the black sheep of a family. In mild cases, a family may avoid a black sheep but little else. In extreme cases, black sheep are disowned, thrown out of the family and forgotten about. It is as if they have died or were never born.

Many families have labelled relatives who have committed serious crimes as black sheep. Finding information on them may be difficult.

If the individual was found guilty of a serious crime in Canada between 1860 and 1962, he may have been executed. Canada hanged one woman and thirty-nine men between 1860 and 1866.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

Column: Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

Title: Column: Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Snippet: While leaving a community event, a friend and I stopped to read a plague dedicated to the men and women who served in the First and Second World Wars. She pointed out a name that had made both lists—a soldier who had served in both wars—and noted that his surname was the same as her maiden name.

I asked if she knew of him. She didn’t. At home, I searched for his history. The first place I looked was the Soldiers of the First World War website.

I found only a few people with this name and located the correct man by checking all the files to learn where the soldiers were born and where they lived when they enlisted. There was only one living in the appropriate province.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

Microfilm vs Microfiche

Diane Tibert:

This is an interesting article comparing microfilm to microfiche. It’s often part of genealogy we don’t pay attention to, yet many of us (at least before the Internet) used these two forms to do our research.

Originally posted on Imaging Systems Inc:

Microfilm and microfiche…maybe it’s the digital age we find ourselves living in, maybe it’s the fact that the English language is crazy and has no rhyme or reason (they both start with micro so they must be the same), or maybe it’s just that microform is a subject in which not many are well-versed, but these two are always getting mixed up.

I’m here to set the record straight.

Though microfilm and microfiche are often thought of as interchangeable terms, the two are actually very different. From formatting to storage to reading the images, microfilm and microfiche are not the same.

Format                                                                                              …

View original 509 more words

Column: Medical Data Portal for First World War Soldiers

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

Title: Column: Medical Data Portal for First World War Soldiers

Snippet: v For more than a decade, Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has provided Canadians access to digital images of the attestation papers for individuals who served in the First World War (1914-1918). They are available in the Soldiers of the First World War database on the LAC website.

This initial introduction to the war records provided researchers with two images: the front and the back of the attestation paper. Sometimes a few more pages were included.

Last year, the LAC began the huge task of digitizing the complete file for each enlisted person. The first installment went online July 2014. This project works alphabetically, so if your ancestor’s surname is at the beginning of the alphabet, chances are their complete records are already available. Every few months, a new group of digital images are added to the collection.

When completed, more than 640,000 Canadian Expeditionary Force personnel records will be available.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.