Column: Genealogical Societies are a Product of the Past

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

TitleColumn: Genealogical Societies are a Product of the Past

Snippet: Six years ago, I learned about a local artist group that accepted not only new members but members who were still learning their skills. I was an amateur with no formal training permitted to join a group where several members were professionals with formal art education. To say I was excited was an understatement.

I paid my dues and waited for the first ‘event’: meeting, workshop, newsletter, etc. A year passed in silence. I reluctantly paid my dues for a second year and let the person know I was interested in participating. “Send me an email, give me a call, let me know what is happening. Is there a website I can find information on activities?”

That year I received a letter in the mail informing me about a meeting to elect board members. Unfortunately I had to work that day so missed it.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

Will genealogy societies always just be there?

Will genealogy societies always just be there? Not necessarily
May 08, 2015
By David Pike, President of Family History Society of Newfoundland and Labrador

Genealogists are well aware that family history and genealogical societies are valuable sources of information and expertise that we can draw upon while pursuing our own individual research. Unfortunately it is also often the case that people are not well acquainted with the struggles faced by genealogical societies. Occasionally accompanying this situation is that some people seem to assume that these societies will always just be there, not necessarily realising that the societies rely upon the generosity of members and donors merely to exist, let alone to thrive.

Having served as the President of the Family History Society of Newfoundland and Labrador since 2013, I want to share some of the challenges that we face, along with putting out a call for help.

To see if you’d be interested in joining (and supporting) the Family History Society of Newfoundland and Labrador and to read more of this article, visit the GlobalGenealogy.com website.

Column: My Five Biggest Genealogy Mistakes

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

TitleColumn: My Five Biggest Genealogy Mistakes

Snippet: There’s a list circulating online called “Seven Common Genealogy Research Mistakes to Avoid” by Lisa Lisson, a genealogist and family historian. If you are part of the online genealogical community, you’ve probably seen this.

Instead of repeating that list here, I’ll make note of the five biggest mistakes I’ve made since I began researching my family tree more than twenty-five years ago.

  1. Disorganisation: When I first began my research, I made notes on random pieces of looseleaf. They were stuck in a folder until the pile grew too thick, then they were put in a binder. Finding information took longer than necessary, and sometimes I would record things twice because I didn’t know I already had it.
  2. Unreliable Memories: Children interpret the world differently than adults, and sometimes the impressions last long into adulthood.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

St. Mary’s Mailing List

There’s a new genealogy mailing list in town. It’s called St. Mary’s. More specifically it’s for the St. Mary’s Municipality in the county of Guysborough County, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Anyone with a connection to the municipality, whether they were born there, live there now, lived there at one time or had ancestors live there, is welcome to join the mailing list.

Continue reading

Column: Recording Memories Before They’re Gone

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

TitleColumn: Recording Memories Before They’re Gone

Snippet: The Internet gives us many things, including access to information and communication. Yet, it takes away things from our lives we might not realise such as social interaction in real life and time. Many of us realise these problems and take steps to correct them if need be.

One specific thing the Internet gives us is global awareness, but this is at the expense of losing moments in history in our own communities.

People can generally discuss what is popular out there in the big world. We read about tornadoes and volcanoes erupting, the latest news on what’s happening in Hollywood and what’s trending on Facebook. But do we know what is happening on our street or just around the corner? And will it make enough impact that we will remember it and share its story with future generations.

This topic was brought up while talking to my local librarian. The library had initiated a project that recorded our community’s history as seen through the eyes of parents and grandparents.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

Column: Invisible Ancestors

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

TitleColumn: Invisible Ancestors

Snippet: Welcome to Health Class 101 and Science 102. It’s been years since the first artificial insemination took place. The first test tube baby (in-vitro fertilization) was born in 1978. Both of these procedures prove science can help make a baby.

In the cattle world, they have artificial insemination down to a…science. Farmers can now choose regular semen (rolling the gender dice) or sexed semen (almost always guaranteed a female). Cows are more desired than bulls for obvious reasons.

Behind closed doors, and perhaps in the kitchen, scientists are working to create human eggs and sperm. One experiment involves mice and their manufacturing of eggs and sperm from their skin tissue. They are already in the testing stages, evaluating their reproduction success and tweaking the components to see if better results can be had.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

Column: If You Seek, You Shall Find

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

TitleColumn: If You Seek, You Shall Find

Snippet: There is a select group of people in this world who can find anything. Name the item—missing socks, roads in the middle of nowhere, maiden names for female ancestors—and they’ll come up with its whereabouts in short time. There is also a select group of people who can’t find anything even if it is ‘hidden’ in plain view.

Most of us, however, fall somewhere between these two groups of people. When you’re a genealogist, it helps to know the researchers who can find anything, but we can’t burden them with every search we undertake on the Internet.

That’s when knowing a few tips on how to take advantage of a search engine’s power comes in handy.

Most databases provide search engines to assist visitors find information faster, and they often provide a help page to optimise it. Each search engine is a little different, so check out help pages and advance search engines to improve your success.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.