Column: If You Seek, You Shall Find

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

TitleColumn: If You Seek, You Shall Find

Snippet: There is a select group of people in this world who can find anything. Name the item—missing socks, roads in the middle of nowhere, maiden names for female ancestors—and they’ll come up with its whereabouts in short time. There is also a select group of people who can’t find anything even if it is ‘hidden’ in plain view.

Most of us, however, fall somewhere between these two groups of people. When you’re a genealogist, it helps to know the researchers who can find anything, but we can’t burden them with every search we undertake on the Internet.

That’s when knowing a few tips on how to take advantage of a search engine’s power comes in handy.

Most databases provide search engines to assist visitors find information faster, and they often provide a help page to optimise it. Each search engine is a little different, so check out help pages and advance search engines to improve your success.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

Guysborough County Genealogy

This week Barry Potter sent a link to his relatively new website. It’s called Guysborough County Genealogy.

The opening page of the site states: Guysborough County is located on the northeast corner of mainland Nova Scotia, Canada.  Border on the northeast by Canso Strait and Chedabucto Bay, on the southeast by the Atlantic Ocean, on the southwest by Halifax County and on the northwest by Antigonish and Pictou Counties.  The county as it is today was established in 1836. From 1759-1784 it was part of Halifax County.

The site includes the following topics:

Links: Informative links to the Internet and Facebook that will help your genealogy research.

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Column: Racing to Keep Up with Technology

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

TitleColumn: Racing to Keep Up with Technology

Snippet: Nothing stays the same. Well, that’s not entirely true: the sun rises in the morning, sets at night; winter slowly transforms into spring; weeds grow faster than cultivated plants. These things are a given, old standbys, but in general, things are always changing.

These changes are obvious in the technology we use today. When I set fingertips on my first keyboard back in the 1980s, we were using large, 5 1/2 inch floppies to store our data. Within a few years, I carried around a small box of 3 1/2 inch floppies that were more solid, and in my mind, more secure.

Fast forward to the early 2000s and the shelf beside my desk became home to CDs and DVDs that stored and backed-up my files. I wrongly believed this was it; I would store my data—everything from my family tree files to my digital photos—on these discs and save them forever. In twenty years, I’d simply pop one into the computer and voila! All my digital stuff would be there…forever.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

Column: Etchings from a Century Ago

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

TitleColumn: Etchings from a Century Ago

Snippet: More than 1,800 years ago, Romans began mining chalk from the limestone cliffs of Picard Plateau located beneath Naours, a town in the north of what is now known as France. The fine powder was used as a building material, as well as a skin-whitener for women. Faces of pure, white skin were considered beautiful in those days.

The Romans’ digging produced tunnels and large open areas. After they abandoned the mines, the locals continued the excavating activities. The years of digging produced an underground city consisting of three kilometres of roads, 300 rooms, a piazza, three chapels, cowsheds, six chimneys and a bakery with ovens. It could accommodate 3,000 people and their livestock.

The network of tunnels became a safe haven for locals during many conflicts and invasions, including the Crusades, Hundred Years’ War, Burgundian Wars, French Wars of Religion and the Thirty Year’s War.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

Canada, born April 9, 1917, Vimy Ridge

PoppyAnybody can take the Ridge, but all the Canadians in Canada can’t hold it,” read the sign placed in No Man’s Land by confident German soldiers. Canadian soldiers proved them wrong.

Ninety years later, we remember that cold Easter Monday, many claim as the moment Canada came into its own. In the words of Vimy veteran, Brigadier_General Alexander Ross, who initiated the first pilgrimage to the Vimy Memorial in 1936, “It was Canada from the Atlantic to the Pacific on parade. I thought then . . . that in those few minutes I witnessed the birth of a nation.

On April 9, 1917, at precisely 5:30 am, the Canadians charged from their trenches and into history. Not a man envisioned the events that would unfold because of their courageous actions.

For the first time in history, the four divisions of the Canadian Corps came together for one objective – capture Vimy Ridge. They were well equipped to engage the enemy in the largest single Allied advance on the Western front up to that point in the war.

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Get the munchers!

Diane Tibert:

An interesting article on bugs. I’ve seen two of the top five in my house.

Originally posted on Library and Archives Canada Blog:

The word “pest” certainly has many uses, but, at Library and Archives Canada, it refers to any of a number of creatures that can pose a threat to library and archival collections. Many insects like to feed on substances found in documents, photographs and books, such as cellulose, starch and glue. And mice like to shred paper for their nests. Pests can work very quickly, and in a short time precious documents can be irreversibly damaged. It is important, therefore, to be aware of such pests and to know what to do to prevent them.

An improperly disposed of muffin wrapper can provide enough nourishment to sustain a population of 9 female mice to produce litters of 5 to 10 pups each. Proper cleaning of areas where food is consumed makes the area less attractive to mice. Having garbage receptacles with tight-fitting lids is also a good deterrent.

One of…

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First World War Inscriptions on inside of Cave Found

NAOURS, France — A headlamp cuts through the darkness of a rough-hewn passage 100 feet underground to reveal an inscription: “James Cockburn 8th Durham L.I.”

It’s cut so clean it could have been left yesterday. Only the date next to it — April 1, 1917 — roots it in the horrors of World War I.

The piece of graffiti by a soldier in a British infantry unit is just one of nearly 2,000 century-old inscriptions that have recently come to light in Naours, a two-hour drive north of Paris. Many marked a note for posterity in the face of the doom that trench warfare a few dozen miles away would bring to many.

To read more, visit the CTV News article that tells the story.