Clan Ross Canada, National Gathering

Clan Ross Canada – Gathering and Annual General Meeting!

July 03-05, 2015, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Do you enjoy – meeting new people? Exploring Canada’s rich history? Great Scenery? Friendly People? Celtic Entertainment?

Then we invite to join your fellow Clan Ross members from across Canada (and the USA) in a place where it all began for many of our ancestors – historic Halifax, in Canada’s “New Scotland”. Halifax is full of history, with friendly people, and a way of life influenced by its beautiful seacoast. With strong celtic connections, it’s fitting that its most famous brewmaster was also its mayor- 3 times (Alexander Keith).

Afterwards, stay on and tour the rest of the incredible Atlantic Provinces and enjoy their famous ‘east coast’ hospitality!

The Gathering will consist of 3 days of fun-filled events in Halifax, July 03-05, 2015, and will coincide with other popular and interesting Celtic activities that will make your east coast trip a memorable one. In addition to the Clan Ross fun, we will enjoy the Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo in Halifax (billed as The World’s Largest Annual Indoor Show) running June 30 to July 7; the International Gathering of the Clans July 1-26 with events planned throughout the province (sponsored by the Federation for Scottish Culture in Nova Scotia), and the Antigonish Highland Games July 05-12, to mention a few.

Continue reading

Kings County Historical and Archival Society Meeting

The Kings County Historical and Archival Society Inc. will hold its next meeting on Saturday February 28th at the Kings County Museum in Hampton, New Brunswick. The meeting starts at 2:00 pm.

The museum director, Chris White, will discuss the current exhibit Though Your Lads Are Far Away at the Museum in Hampton which illustrates the role of Kings County in World War One. A tour of the exhibit will follow her talk.

This exhibit won an award from the Association of New Brunswick Museums and should be a “must see” for everyone!  All are welcome to attend.

Kings County Museum on Facebook.

Column: A Glimpse at the History of Surnames

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

Title: A Glimpse at the History of Surnames

Snippet: People have worn first names, known as given names, for as long as humans can remember. I feel this came about naturally to identify individuals in a tribe or community group. Regardless of the language—or lack of language—it would have been important to know that human #1 was looking for human #2 instead of human #3 when he wanted to go hunting for supper, or that human #4 was lost and a search party was needed to find him.

When populations were small, given names were all that was necessary to distinguish individuals from one another. If two or more people in the same settlement happened to share a name, a description might have been added such as Little Tilly or Red Beard Jos.

When Earth’s population began to grow, those descriptive names became more common and took on different forms in different cultures. Eventually they transformed into surnames, also known as last names and family names. This was the most accurate, but not perfect, way to identify family groups and relatives.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

Column: All the King’s Daughters

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

Title: All the King’s Daughters

Snippet: For a new settlement to survive and thrive, it needs a growing population. In other words, the birth rate must be higher than the death rate. Growing a settlement is difficult when there are only 3,215 individuals involved. It is near impossible when this number includes 719 eligible bachelors and only 45 unmarried women.

The first census in New France revealed 528 families lived there during the winter of 1665-1666. There were 2,034 males and 1,181 females. The census was taken by Intendant of Justice, Police and Finance, Jean Talon, who was appointed by Louis XIV, King of France. His mission was to increase the colony’s self-sufficiency and organise its financial administration. An important component to succeed in this was to see the colony’s population drastically increase.

His final census indicated he was successful. During his appointments (1665 to 1668 and 1670 to 1672), the population grew to 7,600 inhabitants in spite of the incidents of scurvy, smallpox and other diseases in the settlements.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

Column: Odessa Connecting German and Russian History

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

Title: Odessa Connecting German and Russian History

Snippet: One of my father’s older sisters was named Odessa. She was the first and only person I knew with this name. Though I’ve never met her, I have tended to her grave, just a few plots away from Dad’s place of burial.

When I stumbled upon a website called Odessa, I took a second to think about the connection between its purpose and my family. My father’s father was of German decent. The first Tibert (originally Diebert) arrived in Canada in 1751.

I have traced this family line to the Palatinate Area along the Rhine River. Over the centuries, this land has changed hands many times through war. I have no doubt one of the reasons my ancestors left the region is because of the constant threat of conflict. It would not surprise me to learn other family members left as well, given the uncertain conditions. One destination of many Germans leaving their homeland was Russia.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

First World War Veteran Alexander Daniel Archibald

Dan’s younger brother, Robert Edmund, attested with No. 10 Halifax Siege Battery on January 18, 1918 and served at the front with 6th Brigade Canadian Field Artillery during the final days of the war. His story was posted to this blog in August 2014.

A special thank you to Claudia Smith of Almonte, Ontario, Captain A. D. and Nursing Sister Mary (Graham) Archibald’s granddaughter, who graciously provided transcripts of letters, photographs, and information on her grandparents’ lives.

Claudia has written a book about her grandmother’s service as a Nursing Sister. The volume, in the final stages of production, illustrates their tremendous dedication and hard work during the tragic yet exhilarating years of the First World War.

Read more of this story at the First World War Veterans of Guysborough County website.