The Connection of Stone and Graves

The following column appeared in print on February 27, 2016. The Connection of Stone and Graves Diane Lynn Tibert I can’t recall the first time I visited a grave. It was long before I became interested in genealogy. But even then, I knew—from movies, books and photographs—most graves were marked with headstones. Many resting places…

Old Cemeteries in Yarmouth County, NS

By now you all know my love affair with cemeteries. Just when I thought cemeteries couldn’t get any better, I met up with Bill Curry, one of the many volunteers who are part of The Old Beaver River and Port Maitland Cemeteries Preservation Society. Thanks to this group, not only have these cemeteries been cleared…

Hurshman Headstone at Dutch Settlement

In the summer of 2006 I visited St. George’s Anglican Church and its surrounding cemetery in Dutch Settlement, (on the edge of) Halifax County, Nova Scotia, Canada. While there I captured this photograph of a faded wooden cross marking Joan Hurshman’s grave (1937 – 1997). I haven’t been back since to check on the cross,…

Hirtle Headstone at Gays River

When I visit a cemetery, one of my objects—besides photography headstones for individuals in my own family—is to photograph stones that are exceptionally old and those which are perishable. While visiting the Gays River United Church Cemetery a few years ago, I came upon a headstone that may have been more than fifty years old.…

Old Headstone: Mary and John Verner

In October 2007, I visited St. John’s in the Wilderness Anglican Church, New Germany, Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia, Canada and took a few dozen pictures of headstones. The ones I focussed on had a family connection, but a few were either interesting or very old, so I took a snap of them too. Of the…

The Missing Grave of Three Moxon Children

There’s a plain white headstone resting at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic, Halifax, NS. It records the deaths of three young children during an epidemic in 1888. This memorial would not have taken up residence in the museum if not for another tragic event: the Halifax Explosion. The nearby plague tells the tragic tale…