Column: Remembering Post Office Veterans Who Served in First World War

Between today and Wednesday, my genealogy column, Roots to the Past, is available in the following Atlantic Canada newspapers:

Saturday: The Citizen (Amherst)

Saturday: Times & Transcript (Moncton)

Wednesday: The Lunenburg County Progress Bulletin (Lunenburg County)

Title: Remembering Post Office Veterans Who Served in First World War

Snippet: On August 4, 1914, Great Britain declared war on Germany. This meant Canada was also at war. Approximately 650,000 Canadians served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, Merchant Marines and British Forces (including those from Newfoundland who at the time were a colony of Great Britain). More than 68,000 gave their lives before the war ended in 1918.

Men and women who served overseas came from all walks of life. Many left their job or put their education and careers on hold. Lumbermen, doctors, miners, fishermen, teachers and many others donned the uniform to protect the rights of others and to defend the world against tyranny.

A profession that saw a large number of employees go off to war was the post office. More than 1,300 individuals served, including 132 who lost their lives. In 2009—with the one hundredth anniversary of the beginning of the war approaching—the Van-Fraser Heritage Club began researching these veterans. The fruits of their labour became Honouring Our Own: Canada Post Employees in World War I. The 226-page publication also contains data on postmasters from revenue offices and rural route service providers though they were not employees.

. . . To read more, pick up one of the above noted newspapers.

Advertisements

Please share your thoughts on this post.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s